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I've been racking my brain all week trying to remember the name of this book so I can go back and finish it. It's been almost a decade, so I may remember some of the details wrong.

The setting seems to be in a future version of Earth where complex technology is outlawed with religious fervor. It hints at a near apocalyptic event that brought this about, but I didn't learn the details. The technology level is roughly early industrial. The vibe is almost steampunk vibe mixed with American military tradition and British aristocracy.

The book starts off with the main character in military school, eventually being deployed to Australia, I think. It talks a lot about his correspondence with his girlfriend through letters, and I think I remember something about a campaign in India.

The "someone"'s name is a male name that feels familiar because it's also the name of a prominent historical figure, and is the name of the main character's friend/rival at the beginning of the book.

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  • Hi and welcome to the site! Thank you for taking the tour, if you need to please do read the help center for articles on voting and how accepting answers works, If you have any more details, please do edit them in, especially if anything in story-identification triggers a memory. Share and Enjoy!
    – AncientSwordRage
    Jan 28 at 14:19
  • I've looked at the blurbs of: Oldman's War, Astrid's War, Leviathan's War, Chaplain's War, God's War and Philosopher's War... none of them seem to fit. Let me know if they do however, and somebody can post an answer.
    – AncientSwordRage
    Jan 28 at 14:21
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    Hmm, premise is similar to the Safehold series, but that doesn't take place on Earth and you start by learning exactly why the limitations are in place.
    – Harabeck
    Jan 28 at 15:00
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    Butlerian Jihad? It's a bit of a trope but the key technology is often computer intelligence of some sort.
    – Separatrix
    Jan 28 at 15:14
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    Have added an answer below. I found the book to be an enjoyable read. If you like this one I might also recommend "Two Georges" by Harry Turtledove & Richard Dreyfuss as well as "Peshawar Lancers" by S.M. Stirling. Both are standalone novels that, to me at least, have similar tone.
    – beichst
    Jan 28 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

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I believe you are seeking the 2004 book Fitzpatrick's War by Theodore Judson. It was first published by Daw Books.

Points that match:

Book named "Someone"'s War.

Yep.

The setting seems to be in a future version of Earth

Match. 25th century Earth

which complex technology is outlawed with religious fervor

Partial Match. It is not so much just religious, but an electrical damping field that is preventing technology use. "At the same time the Timermen, their hidden technological elite, began developing means of rendering their enemies' electronic technology unusable through development of portable electromagnetic pulse generation technology."

The book starts off with the main character in military school, eventually being deployed to Australia, I think.

Match. "The novel takes the form of an autobiography by a twenty-fifth century soldier, Brigadier General Sir Robert Mayfair Bruce, of the Yukon Confederacy, The history of Judson's world is revealed in the form of an oral history exam given to cadets at the Yukon War College, While a student at the Yukon War College, Sir Robert Mayfair Bruce, ......"

eventually being deployed to Australia, I

Partial Match. Not a deployment. But does end up in Australia. "Bruce flees with a few survivors for Australia, where he is met by Dr. Murrey."

The "someone"'s name is a male name that feels familiar because it's also the name of a prominent historical figure, and is the name of the main character's friend/rival at the beginning of the book.

Match and Match: "Bruce's story chronicles (and criticizes) the career of Lord Isaac Prophet Fitzpatrick, a consul of the fictional Yukon Confederacy whose life closely parallels that of Alexander the Great."

"While a student at the Yukon War College, Sir Robert Mayfair Bruce, decorated veteran of the Mexican War of 2412, is selected by Isaac Prophet Fitzpatrick (Fitzpatrick the Younger) to join his inner circle."

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    Great answer! Well found and we'll explained
    – AncientSwordRage
    Jan 28 at 16:16
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    @AncientSwordRage. Thank you for the compliment.
    – beichst
    Jan 28 at 16:37
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    I find it confusing that you are using quote formatting for things that aren't quotes. Jan 28 at 22:12
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    Sorry for any confusion. I was simply using quotes to delineate portions of text I copied in from the Wikipedia link to distinguish them from comments I was making myself.
    – beichst
    Jan 28 at 22:21
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    The quoteblock was around the wrong way; you are not quoting yourself, and only some of the quoted text is copied from elsewhere, but it is already delineated by quotation marks. The text of the question is what should be quoteblocked, see edit suggestion.
    – Nij
    Jan 29 at 1:23

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